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1 North Street
Hastings-On-Hudson, New York 10706

914-907-0246

King Garden Designs, Inc. can be reached at 914-907-0246 and Connect@KingGardenDesigns.com

King Garden Designs, Inc. is a boutique landscape design practice located in New York. Charles King Sadler, King Garden Designs founder, enjoys creating and enhancing the beauty and vitality of landscapes through thoughtful design, professional implementation and ongoing care.

Member American Society of Landscape Architects & ISA Certified Arborist TRAQ

Exclusive Garden Design, Full Landscape Design Services: master planning, expert installation/planting, expert street tree - design - installation - care, expert boxwood pruning, cloud pruning, hedge trimming, topiary, espalier, orchards, fine gardening and expert design consultations. Landscaping services, Landscaping Consultations, ISA Certified Arborist Assessment, ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification, Expert Boxwood Pruning, Fruit Tree and Orchard Pruning and Care, Landscaping Consultations, Landscaping Property Over Site, Landscape Design, Property Care, Landscape Maintenance. Native plants and drought tolerant plants.

Landscape and Garden Design for Westchester County, NY; Rockland County, NY; Nassau County, NY; Suffolk County, NY; Putnam County, NY; Dutchess County, NY; Fairfield County, CT; Bergen County, NJ

Best Landscaping Based In Westchester county, Bergen county, NJ; Fairfield county, Nassau County, Suffolk County, Dutchess county, Putnam county, Litchfield county, New Haven county, Berkshire county, Hampden county, Hampshire county, Franklin county and beyond including: King Garden Designs are experts at successfully designing and selecting street trees that thrive; beautifying your community, campus, corporate headquarters or institution. We utilize Native plantings and drought tolerant plantings.

We meet to discuss your goals, timing and budget during your street tree consultation.

Master Plan, Street Trees, Garden Design, Garden Care, Expert Pruning, Landscaping Services, ISA Certified Arborist Assessment, ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification, Expert Pruning, Cloud Pruning, Landscaping Consultations, Landscaping Property Over Site, Landscape Design, Property Care, Landscape Maintenance.

Building A New Home - We Can Help

Landscape and Garden Design for Westchester County, NY; Putnam County, NY, Dutchess County, NY; Fairfield County, CT; Bergen County, NJ

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Sustain

King Garden Designs, Inc. can be reached at 914-907-0246 and Connect@KingGardenDesigns.com

King Garden Designs, Inc. is a boutique landscape design company located in New York. Charles King Sadler, King Garden Designs founder, enjoys creating and enhancing the beauty and vitality of landscapes through thoughtful design, professional implementation and ongoing care.

Member American Society of Landscape Architects & ISA Certified Arborist TRAQ

ASLA - American Society of Landscape Architects introduces a series of sustainable design guides that highlight cutting-edge ways for residential landscapes to support the environment—no matter the location or property size.

The ASLA sustainable residential design guides center around increasing energy efficiency, improving water management, applying ecological design and using low-impact materials. Developed for homeowners and landscape architects and designers alike, the guides are designed to help spread more sustainable and resilient practices.

Charles King Sadler of King Garden Designs offers Sustainable garden design services for residential and estate commissions, plus expert Street Tree Design, Installation and Care. We are located in the Hudson Valley. Garden Design Westchester County, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY

Master Plan, Garden Design, Garden Care, Expert Pruning, Expert Boxwood Pruning, Cloud Pruning, Winter Pruning, Hedge Trimming, Landscaping Services, Landscaping Consultations, Landscaping Property Over Site, Landscape Design, ISA Certified Arborist Assessment, ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification.

Landscape and Garden Design for Westchester County, NY; Putnam County, NY, Dutchess County, NY; Fairfield County, CT; Bergen County, NJ

Best Landscaping Based In Westchester county, Bergen county, NJ; Fairfield county, Dutchess county, Putnam county, Litchfield county, New Haven county, Berkshire county, Hampden county, Hampshire county, Franklin county and beyond including:

King Garden Designs, Inc. can be reached at 914-907-0246 and Connect@KingGardenDesigns.com

King Garden Designs are experts at successfully designing and selecting street trees that thrive; beautifying your community, campus, corporate headquarters or institution. We utilize Native plantings and drought tolerant plantings.

We meet to discuss your goals, timing and budget during your street tree consultation.

Master Plan, Street Trees, Garden Design, Garden Care, Expert Pruning, Landscaping Services, ISA Certified Arborist Assessment, ISA Tree Risk Assessment Qualification, Expert Pruning, Cloud Pruning, Landscaping Consultations, Landscaping Property Over Site, Landscape Design, Property Care, Landscape Maintenance.

Building A New Home

Landscape and Garden Design for Westchester County, NY; Putnam County, NY, Dutchess County, NY; Fairfield County, CT; Bergen County, NJ

Best Landscaping Based In Westchester county, Bergen county, NJ; Fairfield county, Dutchess county, Putnam county, Litchfield county, New Haven county, Berkshire county, Hampden county, Hampshire county, Franklin county and beyond including: Amagansett, Ardsley, Ardsley Park, Armonk, Atlanta, Barney Park, Bar Harbor, Bedford, Bedminster Township, Bellaire TX, Block Island, Briarcliff Manor, Bridgehampton, Bronxville, Charleston, Chappaqua, Cold Spring, Cornwall, Cornwall-on-Hudson, Croton Falls, Croton-on-Hudson, Danbury, East Hampton, East Northport, East Quogue, Fairfield, Fishers Island, Garrison, Glen Cove, Great Barrington, Galleria TX, Greatneck, Greenburgh, Greenwich, Harrison, Hampton Bays, Hartsdale, Heights TX, Hudson, Huntington, Irvington, Katonah, Kent, Larchmont, Locust Valley, Litchfield, Matthiessen Park, Martha's Vineyard Island, Mamaroneck, Montauk, Millbrook, Mohegan Lake, Mount Desert, Mount Desert Island, Mount Kisco, Nantucket Island, Nanuet, New Canaan, New City, New Paltz, Newburgh, North Salem, North White Plains, Northport, Norwalk, Nyack, Oakland, Old Greenwich, Oyster Bay, Piermont, Pittsford, Philipse Manor, Pleasantville, Port Washington, Pound Ridge, Purchase, Purdys, River Oaks TX, Quiogue, Ouogue, Ramsey, Red Hook, Redding, Rhinebeck, Ridgefield, Ridgewood, Riverhead, Rowayton, Rye, Rye Brook, Sag Harbor, Savannah, Scarsdale, Sharon, Shelter Island, Shinnecock Hills, Smithtown, Somers, South Salem, Southampton, Water Mill, West Harrison, West University TX, Westhampton, Westhampton Beach, White Plains, Wilton, Wyckoff, Yorktown Heights

Atherton, California (San Mateo); Cherry Hills Village, Colorado (Arapahoe); Scarsdale, New York (Westchester); Hillsborough, California (San Mateo); Short Hills, New Jersey (Essex); Old Greenwich, Connecticut (Fairfield); Los Altos Hills, California (Santa Clara); Bronxville, New York (Westchester); Darien, Connecticut (Fairfield); Winnetka, Illinois (Cook); Great Falls, Virginia (Fairfax); Glencoe, Illinois (Cook); Indian Hill, Ohio (Hamilton); Highland Park, Texas (Dallas); Piedmont, California (Alameda); West University Place, Texas (Harris); Greenville, New York (Westchester); Kentfield, California (Marin); Upper Saddle River, New Jersey (Bergen); Ladue, Missouri (St. Louis); Indian River Shores, Florida (Indian River); Westport, Connecticut (Fairfield); McLean, Virginia (Fairfax); Travilah, Maryland (Montgomery); Montecito, California (Santa Barbara); New Albany, Ohio (Franklin); University Park, Texas (Dallas); Paradise Valley, Arizona (Maricopa); Rye, New York (Westchester); Larchmont, New York (Westchester); Lake Forest, Illinois (Lake); Town and Country, Missouri (St. Louis); Inverness, Illinois (Cook); North Caldwell, New Jersey (Essex); Palm Beach, Florida (Palm Beach); Wolf Trap, Virginia (Fairfax); Los Altos, California (Santa Clara); Palos Verdes Estates, California (Los Angeles); Hinsdale, Illinois (Cook); Wellesley, Massachusetts (Norfolk); Franklin Lakes, New Jersey (Bergen); Southlake, Texas (Denton); Rumson, New Jersey (Monmouth); Potomac, Maryland (Montgomery); Riverside, California (Fairfield); Orinda, California (Contra Costa); Bellaire, Texas (Harris); Malibu, California (Los Angeles); Upper Montclair, New Jersey (Essex); Lawrence, New York (Nassau); Woodbury, New York (Nassau); Alamo, California (Contra Costa); Tiburon, California (Marin); Irvington, New York (Westchester); Long Grove, Illinois (Lake); Glen Ridge, New Jersey (Essex); Mill Valley, California (Marin); East Hills, New York (Nassau); Pepper Lake, Ohio (Cuyahoga); Chevy Chase, Maryland (Montgomery); Tenafly, New Jersey (Bergen); Darnestown, Maryland (Montgomery); Oak Brook, Illinois (Cook); La Cañada Flintridge, California (Los Angeles); Briarcliff Manor, New York (West Chester); Saratoga, California (Santa Clara); Ridgewood, New Jersey (Bergen); Leawood, Kansas (Johnson); Key Biscayne, Florida (Miami-Dade); Summit, New Jersey (Union); Manhattan Beach, California (Los Angeles); Chatham, New Jersey (Morris); Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey (Bergen); Blackhawk, California (Contra Costa); Bethesda, Maryland (Montgomery); Pelham, New York (Westchester); Colleyville, Texas (Tarrant); San Marino, California (Los Angeles); Bernardsville, New Jersey (Somerset); Coto de Caza, California (Orange); Hawthorn Woods, Illinois (Lake); Orono, Minnesota (Hennepin); Floris, Virginia (Fairfax); Pinecrest, Florida (Miami-Dade); Greenwich, Connecticut (Fairfiled); Lake Bluff, Illinois (Lake); Greenwood Village, Colorado (Arapahoe); Beverly Hills, California (Los Angeles); Harrison, New York (Westchester); Garden City, New York (Nassau); South Run, Virginia (Fairfax); Glen Rock, New Jersey (Bergen); Lexington, Massachusetts (Middlesex); Rye Brook, New York (Westchester); Wilmette, Illinois (Cook); Menlo Park, California (San Mateo); Palo Alto, California (Santa Clara); Cos Cob, Connecticut (Fairfield); Western Springs, Illinois (Cook); Fort Hunt, Virginia (Fairfax)

Everyone Can Help Improve the environment in your neighborhood

Source: American Society of Landscape Architects www.asla.org

ASLA - American Society of Landscape Architects provides a series of sustainable design guides that highlight cutting-edge ways for residential landscapes to support the environment—no matter the location or property size. 

  Bio-swale Rain-garden Streetscape

Bio-swale Rain-garden Streetscape

The ASLA sustainable residential design guides center around increasing energy efficiency, improving water management, applying ecological design and using low-impact materials. Developed for homeowners and landscape architects and designers alike, the guides are designed to help spread more sustainable and resilient practices.

 Conserve Energy - Plant Trees For Seasonal Shade And Winter Wind Break  Source: Arbor Day Foundation

Conserve Energy - Plant Trees For Seasonal Shade And Winter Wind Break

Source: Arbor Day Foundation

The four guides fit into a larger trend about the growing preparedness of homeowners to make changes to their landscapes in response to climate change. The ASLA 2017 Residential Landscape Architecture Trends Survey results showed that consumers prefer sustainable design elements for their outdoor living spaces. 

Through integrated site design, a comprehensive approach to sustainable building and site design, sustainable residential landscape architecture practices can not only improve the environment, but also result in net-zero or even climate positive homes. 

ASLA’s guides offer a wide selection of tips, research, and best practices, including The Sustainable SITES Initiative™ (SITES®), a system for developing sustainable landscapes.

Here are some best practices from the guides

Plant pollinator gardens. Bees, bats, and a number of other animals, including birds, beetles, and butterflies, play an important role in keeping ecosystems functioning, and provide vital services such as pollination. Homeowners can support pollinator population growth through such simple and cost-effective ways as growing pollinator-friendly plants, creating urban and residential beekeeping systems, and building bat houses. 

Practice ecological gardening. Edible gardens enable homeowners to grow their own food. However, fertilizers used in home gardens can pollute local watersheds through runoff. To avoid contaminating watersheds and damaging local ecosystems, homeowners growing productive landscapes should practice ecological gardening by using productive plants native to their environment and limit the use of chemicals. 

Install drip irrigation. Drip irrigation systems provide water through slow application directly at plants’ root zones, avoiding excess watering while keeping the roots at optimum moisture level. These systems reduce over-watering, evaporation, runoff and deep percolation of water. Drip irrigation is a cost-efficient means of improving water efficiency. It is adaptable to any landscape and requires minimal maintenance. 

Reuse and recycle. Instead of using increasingly-scarce virgin woods, particularly from tropical hardwoods, homeowners can use reclaimed wood from existing structures and avoid sending that material to the landfill. Recycled wood can be salvaged from places like old buildings and shipping materials, and restored for a variety of residential uses, including decking, seating, and fences. 

Go solar. Landscape architects can work with homeowners to develop an integrated site design to incorporate solar power systems into structures or leverage other energy-efficient technologies. Solar arrays can be placed in optimal locations to achieve the most solar gain with the least visual impact, and co-joining solar and green roof systems can further further improve energy efficiency, extend the value of solar systems, and provide more biodiversity on the roof. 

 Source: Arbor Day Foundation

Source: Arbor Day Foundation

Increasing Energy Efficiency

Inefficient home energy use is not only costly, but also contributes to the growth of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the primary cause of climate change. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the residential sector accounted for 21 percent of total primary energy consumption and about 20 percent of carbon emissions in the U.S. in 2012. And according to Architecture 2030, building construction and operations-related energy use accounts for almost 50 percent of total GHG emissions.

Through integrated site design, a comprehensive approach to sustainable building and site design, sustainable residential landscape architecture practices can not only improve the environment, but also result in net-zero or even climate positive homes. If part of a broader integrated site design, sustainable residential landscape architecture can help eliminate the need for fossil fuel-based energy, while creating a healthy residential environment.

Homeowners can go net-zero or climate positive by tapping the potential of landscapes. As an example, residential green roof and wall systems, which are often key features of integrated site design projects, can reduce energy use and home heating and cooling costs.

According to The Sustainable SITES Initiative™ (SITES®), homeowners can use trees and dense shrubs to shade their home and any external HVAC systems or block wind and thereby further reduce energy use.

Homeowners can further leverage clean energy technologies, like solar-powered LED outdoor lighting.

The environmental and economic benefits of energy efficient technologies increase as homes are tied together into multi-family housing complexes with shared infrastructure. Research shows dense development lowers water and energy use, conserves natural habitats, and reduces transportation-related carbon emissions by encouraging walking, cycling, and taking public transportation. Communities like Freiburg, Germany and Malmo, Sweden are examples of residential communities that have taken innovative approaches to design and planning by implementing sustainable energy, water, and waste management systems.

Landscape architects can help homeowners by undertaking a comprehensive energy audit and then identify landscape-based solutions for generating renewable power or reducing energy waste.

State and local governments also work with design professionals to incorporate sustainable residential landscape architecture codes throughout urban, suburban, and rural areas. For example, South Miami just recently mandated that new buildings, and some renovations, must include solar panels.

Source: Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009, U.S. Energy Information Administration


Improving Water Management

Any residential landscape can be designed to both reduce flooding during storms and conserve water in times of water scarcity. Homeowners can use green infrastructure approaches, like bioswales and bioretention ponds; rain gardens; rain water harvesting; water recycling; and drip irrigation to more sustainably manage water.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) estimates flooding has caused some $260 billion in damages from 1980 to 2013. And in the past decade, flood insurance claims now total $1.6 billion annually, putting further pressure on the already deeply-indebted flood insurance system. Sustainable landscape architecture practices -- including green infrastructure -- can significantly reduce the impacts of flooding on residences. 

Homeowners waste water by irrigating their lawns with water that should be reserved for human consumption. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), nearly 9 billion gallons of water is used for residential outdoor water use, mainly for landscape irrigation, some 30 percent of total residential water use. 

Sustainable residential landscape architecture—if part of an integrated site design, a comprehensive approach to sustainable building and site design—can dramatically reduce water usage while creating a healthy residential environment.

Homeowners can promote the infiltration, storing, and recycling of water, and limit the use of valuable potable water for landscapes. Bioswales / bioretention ponds, rainwater gardens, and local sustainable water recycling and drip irrigation systems can all be used to efficiently manage water. Homeowners can recycle and reuse greywater (and even blackwater) for landscape maintenance, car washing, and toilet flushing.

It's important to note that degraded and compacted soil will reduce water and air infiltration into the ground. Homeowners can maximize the benefits of natural stormwater systems by improving the quality of soil on their property though remediation techniques.

Homes that include natural green infrastructure not only better manage stormwater runoff, but also reduce the massive energy costs associated with running complex water management systems. Water and waste utilities are heavy users of energy and major producers of greenhouse gas emissions.

Local governments are also partnering with non-profit organizations to increase public awareness about using sustainable residential design practices for improving water efficiency. 

Source: Irrigation Controllers, Environmental Protection Agency


Applying Ecological Design

Plants are central to a functioning global ecosystem. Plants oxygenate the atmosphere and reduce atmospheric pollutants. Ecological restoration in both developed and developing countries is a primary strategy for mitigating the impacts of climate change. Native plant communities are not only key to the global ecosystem, but also crucial to environmental and human health at the residential and neighorhood scales.  

In the United States, urbanization has fragmented what were ecologically-productive landscapes. According to the Audubon Society, the continental U.S. has lost 150 million acres of wildlife habitat and farmland to urban sprawl over the last century. Sustainable residential landscape architecture practices can help build a network of productive landscapes. Native plants can be used to regenerate sustainable plant communities and reconnect fragmented ecosystems in residential areas. Creating a network of productive ecosystems expands wildlife habitat areas and boosts human health and well-being by bringing nature's benefits right to residential yards and outdoor spaces.  

Homeowners who use native plants reduce the use of excess water, energy, and chemical fertilizers and pesticides that damage natural ecosystems as well as support pollinators.

Residential landscapes can also be used to grow food at home and in communities. When growing food, gardeners should apply principles of ecological design and permacultural practices to ensure food production and garden systems are integrated with the natural environment and avoid contaminating local watersheds with runoff. Homeowners and communities can create composting systems for efficient waste removal and to increase organic matter in the soil.

And plants can also be used inside the home to improve air quality and human productivity.

Homeowners should be mindful of the quality of the soil on their property. Healthy soils are essential to plant and tree health and enable the infiltration of stormwater into the ground. Years of development and construction can lead to layers of compacted soil that restrict movement of water and air, and limit root growth. Homeowners can achieve credit from The Sustainable Sites Initiative™ (SITES®) by using techniques like subsoiling and adding soil amendments to help rebuild ecosystem function.

Landscape architects partner with communities, non-profit organizations, and local governments to increase public awareness about using sustainable residential design practices that yield productive plant systems and reduce the negative ecological impacts of typical residential development.


Using Low-Impact Materials

New and non-recyclable materials used in homes and landscapes are often not designed to be recycled. These materials can consume enormous amounts of resources to produce and distribute and create additional waste when they are demolished. Waste materials create waste landscapes: landfills, massive incinerator systems, and multi-square-mile floating plastic garbage islands in the world's oceans.

To avoid sending useful materials to landfills and cut down on materials that release toxic substances, The Sustainable SITES Initiative™ (SITES®) recommends reusing or recycling existing materials.

Homeowners can also specify local materials to support local economies and cut down on the energy use from the transportation of materials.

But beyond reused, recycled, or local materials, there are other important ways to reduce the impact of materials on our health and environments.

Sustainable residential landscape design can increase the health of environment through the use of innovative low-impact materials that are permeable and reflective (high albedo).

Permeable materials allow water to infiltrate and recharge aquifers, instead of being sent to combined stormwater and sewer systems.

Reflective, "cool," or white materials help reduce air temperatures, particularly in cities dealing with the challenges of the urban heat island effect, and energy costs by minimizing the use of air conditioning to cool buildings.

There are also more sustainable wood and concrete options out there that minimize consumption of newer materials.

SITES recommends building with certified, sustainably-harvested woods, recycled woods, and recycled plastic or composite lumber to preserve forests, which are critical to sequestering greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

To avoid sending useful materials to the landfill, conserve natural resources, and reduce a project’s carbon footprint, SITES recommends landscape architects source sustainable concrete from manufacturers using supplementary cementing materials, like fly ash – a byproduct of coal-fired power plants. Landscape architects should reuse concrete from structures on the existing site, like crushed concrete as an aggregate base. Concrete that incorporates recycled materials, like crushed glass or wood chips, are a more sustainable and use less cement than traditional pavers.

Used in both landscapes and buildings, low-impact materials can reduce GHG emissions and create a healthier environment.

Local governments can partner with non-profit organizations and landscape architects and designers to increase public awareness about why it's important to use low-impact materials.


About ASLA

Founded in 1899, the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) is the professional association for landscape architects in the United States, representing more than 15,000 members. The Society’s mission is to advance landscape architecture through advocacy, communication, education and fellowship. Sustainability has been part of ASLA’s mission since its founding and is an overarching value that informs all of the Society’s programs and operations. ASLA has been a leader in demonstrating the benefits of green infrastructure and resilient development practices through the creation of its own green roof, co-development of the SITES® Rating System and the creation of publicly accessible sustainable design resources.